Mummified whales and exotic rocks

The moving project started 2015 with the last stage of emptying the Natural History Museum. The collections left are exotic birds on display and geology both the mineral exhibition and a mixed geology collection in the basement.

Birds-of-Paradise

Birds-of-Paradise

Indian peafowl

Indian peafowl

Undertaking this last part of the packing has given us a few reminders, for example to look through all cupboards. In small cabinets under some of the old display cases, quite a few birds were hiding.

The hidden birds.

The hidden birds.

In the mineral collection we get a closer look at some of the extraordinary rocks this world has to offer, but it also reminds us that even rocks aren`t everlasting.

Marcasite is a type of pyrite very susceptible to humidity. This one is disintegrating, a condition known as pyrite decay.

Marcasite disintegrating.

Marcasite disintegrating.

Opals are so called mineraloids, these are hydrated silica. Their content of crystalline water gives them their characteristic play of color and has made them popular gemstones. We were also very fascinated by their many colors.

Opals.

Opals

In the protected whale hall the whale skeletons have been covered with Tyvek to shield them from the dust in the future renovations. The work required scaffolding and more than 300 meters of Tyvek. In the end the whale looked a bit mummified.

In the process.

In the process.

Working on the scaffold.

Working on the scaffold.

Finished!

Finished!